Arts festival Brave New Works is back with a full program of dance, visual arts and more

Kellie BalaamAlbany Advertiser
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Denmark streets will be filled with all things art-related this weekend as community festival Brave New Works gets under way.
Camera IconDenmark streets will be filled with all things art-related this weekend as community festival Brave New Works gets under way. Credit: Stephen Scourfield/The West Australian

Denmark streets will be filled with all things art-related this weekend as community festival Brave New Works gets under way.

Now in its 28th year, Brave New Works is a local arts festival for all creatives — new, emerging and established — providing them with a platform on which to showcase their work.

Several venues across Denmark will be enlivened by dance, music, visual arts, theatre and film as the festival takes place from today until October 31.

Denmark Arts festivals manager Kaiya Ashworth said it was an exciting time.

“We are very lucky to have a range of differing community events in Denmark, however Brave New Works is a stand-out for the local arts community,” she said.

“It encourages artists to test out those brave ideas in a supportive environment.”

Ms Ashworth said the festival this year would put a focus on the theme of connection.

With 29 events set to provide the entertainment over the next week, Ms Ashworth highlighted some which visitors should add to their itinerary.

Violin-maker, composer and performer Robert Zielinski is back to perform an all-original program inspired by the south coast.

Robert Zielinski
Camera IconRobert Zielinski Credit: Supplied

Brave New Bands will feature music maestro David Rastrick and D-Code, a new Noongar rock band from Uncle Charlie Eades.

Moon Bass will return as an upgraded funky five-piece with vocalist Rose Williamson.

A short film screening of Corvus at the Artshouse will be followed by an artist talk with emerging filmmaker Kyra Shewolf, who will discuss her work.

Ms Ashworth said it was a great opportunity to support artists as well as to see the talent that lived within the Great Southern.

“I think its aim was to create a festival that allowed for all creatives in Denmark to be able to come together and show their work,” she said.

“I think this is why it remains so popular and successful.”

Visit denmarkarts.com.au for details.

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