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Pet owners warned to be vigilant after attack of dog

Sophia ConstantineNorth West Telegraph

A Port Hedland resident is warning people to be vigilant after an unprovoked, vicious attack on her beloved dog left her “scarred for life”.

Lou Griffiths was walking her English staffy Quinn with his harness and lead near Kingsmill Street in Port Hedland on Thursday, July 29, when they were approached by two large dogs.

“I watched these two dogs viciously shake my dog, who we love like a child,” she said.

“I yelled and kicked and did everything possible in my strength to pull them off my dog.

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“They would not stop for anything and Quinn had no chance of getting away.

“We are lucky that someone finally heard me and some beautiful people appeared and chased them away.”

Mrs Griffiths said the thick muscle on Quinns neck protected him but feared what the outcome could have been.

“If they had of found me a threat, would they have then turned on me in the way that they were attacking my dog? You never know and that is what makes it terrifying,” she said.

“Quinn and I are both recovering from our bite marks, cuts and bruises and are very thankful that help came before it was too late.”

Mrs Griffiths urged people to notify the Town rangers when a dog was out.

Environmental Health and Community Safety manager Michael Cuvalo said reports of stray dogs were significantly lower compared to the same time last year, which might be the result of more exposure to aggressive or threatening behaviour.

During the period of June to August last year, rangers received eight incident reports for animal attacks, compared to four during the same period this year.

The community has been advised to identify a problem and take precautions to prevent an encounter, socialise their pets, remain calm and in control and, most importantly, report stray animals to rangers as soon as possible because attacks often occur as a result of unreported stray dogs.

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