Tradies turn to physios to stay in form

Sophia ConstantineNorth West Telegraph
Tradies National Health Month is aimed at encouraging men to get regular check-ups.
Camera IconTradies National Health Month is aimed at encouraging men to get regular check-ups. Credit: Picture: Australian Physiotherapy Association

Tradies account for 60 per cent of workplace injuries, according to an Australian Physiotherapy Association study.

August is Tradies National Health month which is a reminder for tradies to look after themselves.

APA data revealed workers in trade occupations lose an average of 5.4 weeks of work each year because of injuries and have 29 per cent more claims for upper limb injuries than all other occupations.

One tradie, Phil Straker, has been working as a boilermaker at West Angelas fixed plant in Newman for the past four years.

After spending a long period of time recovering from limited movement in his lower back, Mr Straker is encouraging others to stop ignoring their pain.

He said without seeing a physiotherapist, he would have had to take time off work to regain his strength to carry out his job.

APA national president Phil Calvert encouraged workers to be upfront and open about their health concerns and take advantage of the help that is available.

He said it was a common misconception that it was a sign of weakness to seek help.

“We need to start meaningful conversations with our tradies to ensure their health is a priority, so that they can continue to play the important roles they hold in the workforce, their families and the community at large,” he said.

“Not caring for their health can lead to time off work and injury that has long-term impacts when not managed properly.

“Physically demanding trade jobs can exacerbate these conditions, but with the strong evidence-based treatment that physiotherapists employ, tradies can maintain their health and continue doing what they do best.”

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