City of Busselton to hold series of free events in honour of NAIDOC Week

Breanna RedheadBusselton Dunsborough Times
A woman is silhouetted behind the Aboriginal flag during an event to mark Sorry Day (2006).
Camera IconA woman is silhouetted behind the Aboriginal flag during an event to mark Sorry Day (2006). Credit: Ian Waldie/Getty Images

Busselton is set to become a cultural hub as the city hosts several free events during NAIDOC Week, linking to this year’s theme, ‘Get Up. Stand Up. Show Up’.

Beginning Friday, July 1, celebrations will begin with a display of Walking on Boodja installed at Mitchell Park.

This display will be a sea of feet with reconciliation messages been written by the members of the public over the last few years.

Also on display will be the city’s first purchased painting by a First Nations artist.

Hanging adjacent to the Undalup room in the city’s administration building, the work is by renowned Elder and custodian of Wadandi/Pibulmun/Menang country Sandra Hill, who said the piece “pays homage to the Dreaming snake”.

City of Busselton mayor Grant Henley and artist Sandra Hill with the newly purchased work.
Camera IconCity of Busselton mayor Grant Henley and artist Sandra Hill with the newly purchased work. Credit: supplied

“The Waugal is our creator … the shield is our protection; like the Waugal, it is a symbol of fighting for, and protecting, our culture, our families and our country,” she said.

The art display will continue at the Old Courthouse with local Noongar/Yamatji/Aussie woman Cassandra Bynder’s exhibition Polychrome.

Winner of the viewer’s choice price at the the city’s art awards , the display “presents a vision of culture and spirit bleeding through to our binary perspective.

On Monday, July 4, the city will hold a flag-raising ceremony and morning tea at the council building with special guests Elder Gloria Hill, cultural custodian Shannon Clohessy and Elder Robert Isaacs.

That evening, Busselton Library will host a Two Cultures, One Story forum with Dr Isaacs where he will discuss the making of his novel of the same name.

A member of the Stolen Generations, Dr Isaacs grew up in institutions and became a rising star in the public service, crossing boundaries between black and white people as well as all levels of government.

Those interested in attending either of these events are recommended to book via Eventbrite.

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