Bunbury students close tech gap with seniors

Ailish DelaneySouth Western Times
Bunbury Library e-learning officer Matthew Wearne, Bunbury PCYC course co-ordinator Amanda Ferguson and library community engagement officer Jacqueline Quadrio watch as student Kaiowas Carroll helps Steve McGavin with the computer.
Camera IconBunbury Library e-learning officer Matthew Wearne, Bunbury PCYC course co-ordinator Amanda Ferguson and library community engagement officer Jacqueline Quadrio watch as student Kaiowas Carroll helps Steve McGavin with the computer. Credit: Ailish Delaney/South Western Times

Bunbury PCYC students and seniors in the community have come together to help bridge the gap between elderly people and technology.

As part of their Certificate in Leadership course, students completed volunteering hours at Bunbury Library where they helped senior citizens to use technology such as mobile phones, computers and e-books.

The library received a Federal Government funding grant to deliver workshops through the Be Connected program, which aims to help those disconnected to learn technology basics and adapt to life online.

Bunbury Library e-learning officer Matthew Wearne said it was about taking away the jargon and the fear of learning to help close the gap and include people on the outside.

Sessions can help people to learn basics such as how to use a computer or tasks like online banking, making Zoom calls and using Facebook.

Bunbury Library e-learning officer Matthew Wearne, Bunbury PCYC course co-ordinator Amanda Ferguson, library community engagement officer Jacqueline Quadrio and student Kaiowas Carroll were all involved in helping seniors like Steve McGavin learn technology.
Camera IconBunbury Library e-learning officer Matthew Wearne, Bunbury PCYC course co-ordinator Amanda Ferguson, library community engagement officer Jacqueline Quadrio and student Kaiowas Carroll were all involved in helping seniors like Steve McGavin learn technology.

Course co-ordinator Amanda Ferguson said it was the first time students had been involved with the program.

“It was a good chance for the youth to be involved in a collaborative development opportunity,” she said.

I hope they took away an understanding of the fact that not everyone may have the same technology experience they may have.

Amanda Ferguson

Steve McGavin, 65, said the students helped him to learn more about modern technology and become more comfortable with it.

“It felt good to bridge that gap,” he said.

The library is hosting its final session on November 14.

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