Perth weather: Heavy rainfall drenches Perth with worse to come

Headshot of Bethany Hiatt
Bethany HiattThe West Australian
Wet weather in Gosnells and Lynwood on Monday.
Camera IconWet weather in Gosnells and Lynwood on Monday. Credit: Carmel Mangini, Lucy Marshall and Michael Robertson

Minor flooding has caused damage to some houses in Perth’s south-eastern suburbs after Monday morning’s deluge, with emergency services warning of worse to come.

State Emergency Service volunteers were called to the worst-affected areas in Gosnells, Riverton, Thornlie and Kelmscott, with most calls for water leaking into homes.

Department of Fire and Emergency Services assistant commissioner Jon Broomhall said the SES had received more than 150 calls for assistance since 10pm on Sunday.

“The majority of those have been leaking roofs, leaking gutters, missing tiles and other things that have been caused by the wind,” he said.

“Most of the damage has occurred in the metropolitan area and concentrated around the southern suburbs.”

A severe weather warning remains in place for Perth, which was hit with around 40mm of heavy rainfall on Monday morning, with more to come.

Wet weather in Perth due to the storm this morning. Image taken in the Gosnells area
Camera IconWet weather in the Gosnells area. Credit: Beck Bennett/Facebook

The Bureau of Meteorology has alerted residents across much of WA’s South West to the threat of flash flooding, large hailstones and destructive wind gusts of up to 125kmh.

As slippery road and bucketing rain made driving conditions dangerous for Perth motorists on Monday morning, strong winds were expected to increase later in the day before easing on Tuesday.

Another massive dump of 30 to 40mm of rainfall was also likely overnight, especially around the hills.

The front was expected to be windier than a typical front, bringing the kind of stormy weather only seen in Perth around twice a year.

Assistant Commissioner Broomhall warned driving conditions would be difficult, urging drivers to slow down and use their headlights.

“If it is a dangerous area on the road, pull over and wait for the storm to pass,” he said. “People need to be aware of fallen trees, fallen powerlines and any other dangers that might present as a result of the heavy winds.

“If your home is badly damaged, please wait till the storm ends before you go out and inspect it.”

Thunderstorms, hail and even a small tornado have already torn through parts of the Great Southern.

The Bureau of Meteorology said heavy hail was reported in the wheatbelt on Sunday, while a weak tornado hit Beenong, near Lake Grace 300kms southeast of Perth.

Vision recorded by a local resident shows the tornado twisting through the paddocks, with branches and trees seen flying more than 50m across the field.

BOM meteorologist Joey Rawson said super thunderstorm cells were “quite a rare event in Australia”.

“They’re not like your classic American tornadoes,” he said. “But the environment was set up for one (tornado) yesterday.”

Bureau duty forecaster Angeline Prasad said it was unusual to see a deeper low pressure system coupled with a vigorous front moving across the South West land division.

“We normally just see this type of weather a couple of times a year,” she said.

“Heavier falls are expected to continue tonight and start to ease, probably after 6am tomorrow for Perth and along the west and South West coasts.”

Another front poised to cross the coast means Perth is likely to see lighter showers on Wednesday.

“It’s going to brush past the South West coast, so Perth will probably just see a flurry of lighter showers — we’re not going for much rainfall on Wednesday,” Ms Prasad said.

Farmers in parts of WA’s wheatbelt can also expect moderate falls of between 20 and 40mm.

PERTH WEATHER FORECAST

Monday: Storms, heavy showers, 12-17

Tuesday: Showers easing, 13-21

Wednesday: Possible shower, 11-21

Thursday: Partly cloudy, 9-21

Friday: Partly cloudy, 9-21

Saturday: Possible shower, 9-20

Sunday: Possible shower, 7-19

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