Locals heed call to clean up

Daneka Hill and Shannon BeattieThe West Australian
Phil Johnson and Harry.
Camera IconPhil Johnson and Harry. Credit: North West Telegraph

Towns and cities took part in a nationwide rubbish collection to do their bit for the environment on Sunday — and Hedland was no exception.

Sixteen people took their rubbish bags to locations across town, including Scadden Road, Pretty Pool and Cemetery Beach.

Four weekends worth of rubbish had already been collected in the lead- up to the official day, resulting in 350kg of litter being removed from the environment in total.

Fifty-three volunteers helped the mission with an army of more than 500 Hedland school students.

Drafted into the cause on Friday, St Cecilia’s Year 6 students are studying sustainability this term.

Teacher Rachel Mullins said good habits needed to be taught early.

“It is important to set the tone for kids, as they’re going to be leaders in a few years time, and give them the message that we need to reduce, reuse and recycle,” she said.

BHP representative David Tench, James Townsend, 12, Maria Davila, 11, Care for Hedland representative Julie Arif and Logan Marsden, 11, participate in Clean Up Australia Day at St Cecilia’s Primary School.
Camera IconBHP representative David Tench, James Townsend, 12, Maria Davila, 11, Care for Hedland representative Julie Arif and Logan Marsden, 11, participate in Clean Up Australia Day at St Cecilia’s Primary School. Credit: Shannon Beattie

Cemetery Beach had the biggest number of volunteers on Sunday.

Care For Hedland’s Angela Rooney said an international visitor had even joined in to help out.

“There was a gentleman who was over from India, a grandad, and he loved it — he was really chuffed to see what people are doing,” she said.

Peter Pope said picking up litter was about having pride in your community. The most common type of litter picked up on the day was cans, followed by plastic wrapping.

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